Safe Farming

Safe Farming Tasmania is a state government initiative that was launched in 2015 and provides free health and safety advice and guidance, and easy to understand and use farm safety resources.

Its main aim is to encourage positive safety discussions within our farming communities. Most importantly, it was developed in consultation with a reference group of key rural sector stakeholders (including the TFGA) and is chaired by TFGA Board Member and Bracknell farmer, Corey Spencer.

It aims to reduce the number and severity of farm related injuries and disease and improve the safety of our farm workers by:

  • Raising awareness of farm safety issues through positive safety discussions
  • Building positive safety cultures and influencing attitudes
  • Producing and distributing quality farm safety information; and
  • Working with our rural sector stakeholders to provide training and education

The Safe Farming Tasmania program is a joint initiative of WorkSafe Tasmania and the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and the Environment (DPIPWE).

Leading the Safe Farming Tasmania Program is Senior WHS Consultant Phillip John. Book a visit with Phill now on 0407 015 400 or email phillip.john@dpipwe.tas.gov.au.

Also introducing Stuart Beams, Stuart recently joined the Safe Farming team to help deliver practical safety solutions to Tasmanian farmers. Stuart brings 19 years of experience in the work and safety field and is passionate about improving physical and mental wellbeing on farms. Stuart has an easy to approach manner and is ready to support farmers, you can contact him directly on 0400 140 146 or email stuart.beams@justice.tas.gov.au


How Safe Farming can help you

Get practical tools and support to improve health and safety in your business. It’s free and confidential.

The team can support your safety efforts by:

  • holding a discussion or information session with your workers on safety topics specific to your needs and farm
  • working with you to identify safety issues
  • providing you with practical resources so you can farm safely. These include induction checklists, hazard checklists, safe work procedures and safety awareness videos.

Resources


COVID-19 Controls Checklist

Print this practical checklist as a guide to ensure you are meeting COVID-19 protocols in relation to physical distancing, hygiene, cleaning and monitoring systems.

Safe farming induction videos (external link)

Watch videos on safe animal handling, chemical safety, chainsaw safety and more.

These generalised farm safety induction videos and accompanying handbook are an initiative of the Safe Farming Tasmania reference group, an industry-led stakeholder reference group that is a significant component in WorkSafe Tasmania’s approach to supporting our farmers improve work health and safety.

Safe farming induction handbook

This handbook will help new workers better identify the hazards and risks that may be present in their work environment.

For a printed copy of the handbook, call AgriGrowth Tasmania on 1800 291 100 or email AGT.Admin@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

Quad Bike Safety

Farming and Mental Health


Just as physical safety is paramount for farmers and farm workers, so is mental health and well-being. For example, if someone has untreated depressive symptoms (such as feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness, changes in sleeping habits, and withdrawing from friends, family and things they normally enjoy), their risk of unintentional injury increases by 41%, which can be life-threatening on the farm.

The good news is that many mental health concerns are treatable. If you, or someone you know is having a tough time, and you’re not sure what to do, a great place to start is by contacting Rural Alive & Well (RAW). RAW is a confidential support service who work in rural and remote communities. They have workers across Tasmania who will be able to offer support, advice and referral to other services if required. Anyone can contact RAW on their 24/7 support line, by phoning 1300 HELP MATE (4357 6283).

More about RAW click here